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News: Neuroscience

Computer Image Of A Human Head And Brain
Funding Announcements
New Research Network to Measure and Promote Emotional Well-Being
March 16, 2021

The University of Wisconsin–Madison has received a $2.5 million four-year grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to establish a research network on the plasticity of well-being and to develop innovative measures of the key pillars of well-being. Faculty and experts from the Center for Healthy Minds are leading the effort.

A Human Painted In Watercolor Holding A Hand Over Heart To Demonstrate The Link Between Stress In The Body And In The Mind
Mind, Brain and Emotion
When Feelings of Stress Align with the Body, People Have Higher Levels of Well-Being
May 10, 2019

When stress levels in the mind and body are in sync, a person is more likely to have higher levels of well-being

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Mind, Brain and Emotion
Expectant Mothers’ Mental Health May Shape Neural Highways in Infants’ Brains
August 27, 2018

Findings from the Center for Healthy Minds suggest that expectant mothers' mental health may influence the white matter development in the brain of her child

Water Splash On Black Background
Mind, Brain and Emotion
Meditation Affects Brain Networks Differently in Long-Term Meditators and Novices
July 23, 2018

In one of the largest studies to date on the topic, research from the Center for Healthy Minds suggests that meditation affects the brains of long-term meditators and novices differently

Thinker Web
Neuroscience
New Approaches in Neuroscience Show It's Not All in Your Head
February 16, 2018

Richard Davidson shares the latest research on why experience matters at the 2018 American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Austin, Texas

Epigenetics Aging Web
Mind, Brain and Emotion
The Epigenetic Aging Clock Runs Slower in Meditators, Study Suggests
September 8, 2017

A new study is the first to suggest that the long-term practice of meditation may slow down the epigenetic clock in immune cells